Matching workers’ profile to job is good talent management

Employers should match the individual’s profile to the job for optimum performance and a good work attitude at the workplace.

Speaking on “Talent Management via Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) in the digital economy”, Dr Arivalan Ramaiyah, Director & Principal Consultant for Praxis Skills Training & Consultancy Sdn Bhd, said a good talent manager must put aside ego, emotions, and self when dealing with people, and “calibrate to match with the worker’s values and emotions”.

Dr Arivalan had the audience in stitches with his examples and explanations.

Dr Arivalan had the audience in stitches with his examples and explanations.

He stated that if you match with the behaviour of a person, “you can gain their rapport more rapidly and connect with them. Understanding a person’s personality type allows you to give them information in a way they are most receptive to.”

He said most conflicts in the workplace are caused by people’s extrinsic and intrinsic values. “Intrinsic values like self-image and self thought are the source of our core motivation and behaviour patterns. It is programmed in our mind, hence called metaprogrammes. The state of mind, or emotions, is trapped at our unconscious level. There is a barrier between our conscious and unconscious mind, and so we do not sometimes know why we respond or act in a certain way,” he remarked.

Understanding the language and behaviour profile of employees.

Understanding the language and behaviour profile of employees.

He highlighted the various Language and Behaviour Profiles (LAB) of individuals and why matching the job to the worker’s profile is important.  “The ‘Towards To’ people are solution providers, anxious to know the problem and diagnose it, while the ‘Away From’ worker gets disturbed when you bring them problems. The ‘Procedural’ people are all about filling forms, while ‘Optional’ people hate procedures.”

Dr Arivalan pointed out that the ‘Proactive’ people blame themselves when something happens, while ‘Reactive’ workers blame everybody else. “Reactives can destroy the culture of an organisation as they play the blaming game.”

The job must match the employee’s profile, says Dr Arivalan.

The job must match the employee’s profile, says Dr Arivalan.

He said ‘Internal’ people hate the meetings culture, and want to be left alone to do a job, and the “External’ characters are very sociable. “A ‘Self’ person is selfish, micro manages, and wants a say in everything; the “Others” person is considerate and concerned about people; the ‘Independent’ is comfortable working solo, produces results and a good taskmaster; and the “Cooperative” is dependent.”

“Most conflicts arise in the company from profile mismatch of the worker to the job. To manage talent, you must go into the psyche of individuals and match the worker’s personality profile to fit the job,” he stressed.

The Q&A session in progress.

The Q&A session in progress.

He advised employers to match jobs to the worker’s profile, and to have interview questions to determine the applicant’s profile. “If the job matches their profile, then he has passion, gives his best and loves his job.”

Dr Arivalan also highlighted the performance and potential matrix to manage talent, where skills are mapped against attitude, ranging from low to high.  He explained that a skilled person may complete his tasks well but if he has attitude problems, he will create enemies in the process. He cited examples of bad attitude as arrogant, anger, humiliate people in front of others, show a bad example, use bad words, and back-stabbing.

From left: Dr Arivalan, School of Business & Administration Acting Dean Prakash Arumugam, Parameswaran Ayahoo from MIMOS, and moderator of talk, Assoc Prof Dr Balakrishnan Muniapan.

From left: Dr Arivalan, School of Business & Administration Acting Dean Prakash Arumugam, Parameswaran Ayahoo from MIMOS, and moderator of talk, Assoc Prof Dr Balakrishnan Muniapan.

He suggested employers balance skills of workers with their potential/attitude, clarifying that skills can be taught easily while attitude is difficult.