Changing values of youngsters

An academician, with 35 years experience teaching the young, highlighted the changing values of youths over the past few decades, during a public talk organised by WOU in partnership with the Indian High Commission at the main campus.

Speaking on ‘Role and Identity Pattern of Youth in India and ASEAN countries’, Prof Indira J Parikh, President, Foundation for Liberal and Management Education, Pune based her observations on her extensive work with the young in India.

Prof Indira gives insight into understanding youths.

Prof Indira gives insight into understanding youths.

Prof Indira remarked that the lifestyle of this young generation is qualitatively different. “They live in a world of plenty, come from smaller families, educated, and have prosperity. Their attitude is that the world belongs to them, we should get what we deserve and want. So it is difficult for them to take ‘no’ and wanting things here and now is dominant.”

While the concerns of youths in the 1970s were family, siblings’ education, and aged parents, the youth of today, she said, are concerned with moving ahead in their career – often changing jobs, enjoy a lifestyle of leisure through travels, and even moving to another country.

Responding to queries.

Responding to queries.

During the Q&A session, she explained that in the last 50 years, the young are enjoying a quality of life that was earlier only available to few, thus influencing the amount of time given to children and social values.

The family, she added, gives anchor and a sense of belonging, teaching the youngsters to differentiate between right and wrong, and that when they do wrong, there are consequences.

“You got to be a good family member first, a good employee, good citizen, and good to yourself,” she told some 20 people who attended the talk, including Vice Chancellor Prof Dr Wong Tat Meng.